Two-time Australian PGA Champion ('72-'73) Randall Vines gives his thoughts on the modern game and shares some memories from an illustrious career.

Nothing beats winning. Keeping momentum going when you have confidence is an addictive feeling. But golf is a funny game – you can lose your confidence with the click of a finger but you can get it back equally as quick.

Jason Day is a confident player. We saw it at the beginning of the year when he came out of the blocks to win two events in a row. It's been a pleasure watching him go about his business as world Number 1 and it's a shame that injuries have slowed him down towards the end of the season. Hopefully he'll come back stronger in 2017 and we'll see that confidence return.

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Injuries seem so prevalent in today's game. Maybe there's too much emphasis being put on strength and conditioning? I'm not 100 per cent sure. But something I am sure about is the techniques have changed.

Back in my day we were always taught to lift our left heel and move our weight across our right side but there seems to be more twisting in the modern player's swing. It's as if they're trying to hit it harder and those movements are obviously having an effect on their bodies.

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I Don't know where the time has gone. I was at a PGA Morning Tea event recently that celebrated all the 50 and 60-year PGA Members here in Queensland. We all received a plaque and pen as a memento.

It was nice to catch up with all the old blokes I used to play against, reminiscing about the good, old days. I've done OK in my senior years, too. Winning the NZ Senior PGA when I was 62 was probably the highlight. I've had a few other small wins along the way and some seconds in Europe.

Of course when I was younger, winning back-to-back Australian PGA Champs in 1972/73 was a big moment in my career. It was that word I talked about earlier – confidence. I had a great little run there for a while before it went cold.

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I've been given plenty of advice over the years but one tip stands out. I was once told you have 15 clubs in your bag – the 15th club being your temperament. I think a lot of today's players could afford to think like that. They seem to be so fiery.

We always looked up to guys like Kel Nagle and Peter Thomson because they were always cool and calm under pressure and their scores ultimately reflected that. They really were the perfect role models.

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I Practiced pretty hard when I was young and keen. To get ahead in this sport you've got to put in the work. It's that simple.

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Now that it's been and gone I truly believe golf has a place in the Olympics. I also think those players who qualified and declined to go to Rio are probably regretting it now. I'm sure we'll see more players commit to Japan in four years' time because it's a nation that has the history, passion and infrastructure to hold such an event.

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It's been great watching Australia's amateurs winning all over the world this year. Kids like Curtis Luck and Cameron Davis have carried the Aussie flag with gusto. But I really like the look of young Brett Coletta. He swings it so well and looks to have a big future.

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I was sorry to hear of the passing of Arnold Palmer. I played with Arnie twice, once at Royal Canberra and the other time at Metropolitan. They were truly great times. Arnie was exciting – you expected him to do something out of the ordinary.

Naturally he was lovely to play with. I can remember playing a round with Arnie and Bruce Devlin, and Bruce had got off to a bad start. So Arnie gave him a quick lesson on the fifth tee, straightened him out, and Bruce ended up finishing fourth in the tournament. That was Arnie at his best.

I also remember shooting four birdies in a row and Arnie just gave me that little glare as if to say "What are you doing?" I ended up shooting the same score as him that day and it still remains one of my proudest days in golf. Rest in Peace, Arnold.